Tag Archives: family dynamics

25Jul/17

Remains by J. Warren

Scholastic author J. Warren has recently been on our show! To find out more about what makes him tick, and get links to his work, listen to Episode 121: So That’s a Thing!

REVIEW

Told in the first person, this is a deep, dark and compelling book. Mike Kendall is a troubled man, on meds and having therapy to untangle the torments of his past, when he is told to go home to his folks for Thanksgiving. At the same time, bones have been found, which might belong to a boy he was friendly with in his teens.

The author has been very clever, as the whole way through the book, I wasn’t sure whether Mike was a good guy, or a bad guy trying to cover up past crimes (no spoilers.) For a while, I didn’t actually like him very much. He didn’t seem that caring towards his girlfriend, forever waiting for him to call her, or particularly sympathetic towards his sister, whose lesbian affair was alienating her from their parents. But I know that people with mental health issues can sometimes come across as unlikeable, so the author had hit the mark with Mike dead on. When we find out the reason for all his past torments, it seemed a little too easy, but there was enough to keep the mind ticking over with everything else going on around him.

It’s difficult to say much more without letting slip some of the many secrets the small town of Placeville holds, but I can say that there are many, and they are very dark indeed. I genuinely did not see the denouement coming, and I wasn’t expecting the satisfaction I felt at the very end. In fact, I read it twice to make sure I hadn’t missed anything.

Anyone fascinated by the “small-town America seething with murky skeletons in the closet” genre, will love this. It is a Salinger-esque character study of one man, but also one place, the town, and the lengths it will go to, to remain normal on the outside. Again, I’m choosing words carefully, so as not to spoil anything. There are elements of horror, of murder/mystery, of sex (and one extremely well-written intimate scene, blooming into a fledgling relationship) and social commentary, as well as the complicated dynamics within a fragmenting family. Half-way through Remains I realised I didn’t want to put the book down until I’d finished it. It was a slow burn, to be sure, but well-worth the effort.

BLURB

J. Warren’s Remains is an insular story, almost claustrophobic as we first join Mike Kendall where he lives: walled up in his own mind. As the book progresses, Kendall is drawn back to his hometown of Placerville, when the remains of a long-missing boy are finally found, a boy Kendall had shared a complicated history. No matter how much Kendall tries to resist the underside of the mystery behind Randy McPherson’s disappearance, he must confront the lies that he has built his life upon.

02Nov/16

Review of Of Paradise & Purgatory by Stephen del Mar

Stephen del Mar has visited us a couple of times on WROTE. To listen to his interview and find out more about his latest work, follow this link. Episode 048: Digital Disruption, Baby!

REVIEW

para It’s no secret that I love Stephen del Mar’s work. He captures the whole Floridian landscape and way of life incredibly well, and it feels almost like I’m there when I read one of his books, sipping sangria and sunbathing on the Gulf Of Mexico.

Of Paradise & Purgatory moves the action to Arizona, another of my favourite US destinations. It’s all here; the heat and dust, and big skies and hot cowboys in leather chaps. The creak of saddles and the smell of sweat… Victor Cruz returns to Paradise, the town where he grew up, to bury his estranged father. The tagline reads “going home can be hell, even when it’s Paradise” and it’s a good description. Victor is gradually sucked into all the friends and family dynamics and politics, and is soon regretting his return.

As ever, there is a large cast of characters, all expertly and lovingly-drawn. There are references to Bennett Bay and its own characters, and everything is woven together with a bit of political intrigue, some magical realism, and a large dose of angst.

Victor is unapologetic, not very likeable at first, but he grew on me. I liked his honesty, the fact that he did not want the complications of a romance, that he had the courage to miss his father’s funeral even under the weight of expectation, that he snared a much younger man and was upfront with him. He was prickly about the subject of his dad, and the fact that everyone else thought the man was so wonderful when all Victor could remember was the beatings. The way he learned more about himself as time went on, and stuck to his guns with forcing others to see the truth, made me respect him even more. Yes, he came over as self-pitying at times, but that only made him more human.

The book was a colourful mix, with a café bomb and Day Of The Dead celebrations off-setting the apple-pie family imagery. There was a hint of corporate intrigue, possibly explored further on in the series, that could have been clarified more. And the magical realism was the only bit of the book that I felt uneasy with. Until then, I had not picked up any markers that it was on the cards (other than the synopsis.) The seasoning, as the author describes it, was added a little heavily towards the end, and felt slightly uneven.

But it’s a small quibble, as this is a book about Victor Cruz, and how he learns to accept both himself and the kindness of those around him. The feel is different to Stephen del Mar’s other books, in that it takes on a more serious, literary tone, but don’t let that put you off. This is great fun, a book about family, love, sex and friendship dynamics that punches way above its weight.