Monthly Archives: April 2017

28Apr/17

Russell Ricard

April 28, 2017


It gives us great pleasure to announce Russell Ricard as the guest on episode 109: Just Keep Showing Up!

This week Russell Ricard joins us to talk about his new novel The Truth About Goodbye, moving from early script, to novel, and onward to screenplay, and the inspiration for the work.

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Bio:

Louisiana Creole, Russell was born in Baton Rouge. At eight years old, he moved to Los Angeles, California. And since 1988, he’s called New York City home.

For over three decades, he worked as an actor, singer, and dancer in regional, national tours, and international productions, including appearing on Broadway. He has a BA in Psychology from CUNY/Queens College, and earned his MFA in Creative Writing from The New School.

He’s intrigued with the psychosocial aspects of otherness: the quality or fact of being different. Therefore, his writing often includes themes of growing up; aging; family dynamics; and also romantic couplings, including how character’s race, sexual orientation, and gender inform interpersonal relationships.

His writing has appeared and/or is forthcoming on thewritelife.com, mrbellersneighborhood.com, and in Newtown Literary. His novel, The Truth About Goodbye, is available from all major book outlets.

He currently lives in Forest Hills, NY with his husband, cat, and a lovingly supportive stand up desk named Ruth.

 

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21Apr/17

Kevin Klehr

April 21, 2017


It gives us great pleasure to welcome back Kevin Klehr as the guest on episode 108: Always Come with Cake!

This week Kevin Klehr returns to talk about his new novel From Top to Bottom, his foray into erotica, his new publisher Nine Star Press, and then Kevin drops tips for writers.

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Bio:

Kevin lives with his long-term partner, Warren, in their humble apartment (affectionately named Sabrina), in Australia’s own ‘Emerald City,’ Sydney.

From an early age Kevin had a passion for writing, jotting down stories and plays until it came time to confront puberty. After dealing with pimple creams and facial hair, Kevin didn’t pick up a pen again until he was in his thirties. His handwritten manuscript was being committed to paper when his social circumstances changed, giving him no time to write. Concerned, his partner, Warren, snuck the notebook out to a friend who in turn came back and demanded Kevin finish his novel. It wasn’t long before Kevin’s active imagination was let loose again.

 

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February 12, 2016

 NatTheNewYorker_cvr_100dpi-210x330DramaQueensLoveScenes_100dpi_cvr-210x330DramaQueensAdultThemes_100dpi_cvr-210x330 It gives us great pleasure to announce Kevin Klehr as the guest on Episode 043: Life is a Cabaret.
Join us as we talk with Kevin about trusting your editor, contracts and how to read them, what equality and mainstream mean to a queer author, turning a trope on its head and the international Con experience.
You can find Kevin’s novels here:

Connect with Kevin on the web:

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17Apr/17

Review of Sacred Band by Joseph D. Carriker Jr.

I have been gifted an Advanced Reading Copy of Sacred Band in exchange for an honest review. Sacred Band is to be published by Lethe Press in April 2017.

The author is an experienced gamer, which definitely comes through in the book. There’s quite a lot to take in. For starters, at least four of the main characters had two different names. For a non-gamer, this has the potential for confusion, but for any hardened D&D, ComicCon or Marvel fans, this is familiar territory.

Once I had figured out who was who, and had learned their superhero names, it was much easier. And it made total sense. After all, when your superpower is being able to create lethal metal ballbearings and use them as bullets, then “Rusty” probably isn’t the first name you’d choose.

The author has brought the “supers trying to save the world’ theme bang up-to-date, starting with the disappearance of one of Rusty’s gay friends from the internet. Rusty suspects he has been kidnapped, along with others. There were obvious nods to the horrific problems LGBT people are suffering in Russia and other closeted countries, and he soon realises that the problem is far deeper, and far more world-threatening than he could have imagined. It’s a problem that needs extraordinary people to tackle it, and the government just aren’t up-to-scratch. He then has to pull together a super-team, and deal with all the issues those characters bring to the table. There are politics at play, some with familiar overtones, and complex diplomatic delicacies worthy of The West Wing. It gives the superhero genre a grown-up, satirical edge that makes it stand out.

Chock-full of superhero shenanigans

As I said before, I’m a non-gamer, so I thought that at times, all the mini-conflicts got in the way of central story. I had to pick through them to find the core of the book. Sometimes, it read a little busy and IMO the editing could have been tightened up in places, yet I liked the characters immensely, my favourite being Deosil (I just want that girl in my life right now!) I did get the sense that they were family, rather than friends, and Sentinel, the super who was exiled after the scandal that outed him, was more of a father figure than a love interest for Rusty. The sexual tension between them wasn’t convincing at first, but I kind of got it as the story went on. Personally, I would have matched Sentinel and Optic, but there you go.

I felt that the author was far more comfortable when choreographing the fight scenes, as they were fantastically drawn, and the political power play, than with the personal relationships, which seemed awkward in places. Despite that, I thoroughly enjoyed the book and it grew on me as it went on. At a generous 400 or so pages, Sacred Band is chock-full of superhero shenanigans to delight the most hardened of fantasy readers.

BLURB

The golden age of heroes is decades past. The government could not condone vigilantism and now metahumans are just citizens, albeit citizens with incredible talent, who are assisted in achieving normal lives (including finding good fits for their talents employment-wise) by a federal agency.

Rusty may have been a kid during that glorious age but he remembers his idol, Sentinel, saving lives and righting wrongs — until he was outed in an incredible scandal that forced him into isolation. When a gay friend of Rusty living in the Czech Republic goes missing, Rusty is forced to acknowledge that while the world’s governments claim that super teams are outdated and replaced by legal law enforcement, there are simply some places where the law doesn’t protect everyone — so he manages to find and recruit Sentinel to help him find his friend. But the disappearance of the friend is merely one move in a terrible plot against queer youth. A team of supers may be old-fashioned, but this may be a battle requiring some incredible reinforcements.

14Apr/17

Joseph Carriker

April 14, 2017


It gives us great pleasure to announce Joseph Carriker as the guest on episode 107: Indignation Junkie!

This week Joseph Carriker joins us to talk about gayming, queer visibility in gayming and at gaming conventions, and his new novel Sacred Band.

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Bio:

Joseph Carriker is the developer for Green Ronin’s A Song of Ice and Fire Roleplaying, as well as the adjunct Chronicle System line of game supplements.

He has been writing in the gaming industry for sixteen years now, and has worked on a variety of game lines over those years, including most of White Wolf/Onyx Path’s World of Darkness, Exalted and Scion lines, Wizards of the Coast’s Dungeons & Dragons Third Edition line, and Green Ronin’s Blue Rose and Mutants & Masterminds in addition to his work on A Song of Ice and Fire Roleplaying.

He is an outspoken queer gamer, having helped organize and take part in the annual Queer as a Three-Sided Die panels at GenCon. He has also just published his first novel, Sacred Band. Joseph lives in Portland, Oregon with his partner A.J., and likes to believe he does his part in Keeping Portland Weird.

 

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07Apr/17

David Pratt

April 7, 2017


It gives us great pleasure to announce David Pratt as the guest on episode 106: I’ll Answer Anything!

This week David Pratt joins us to talk about his new YA novel, gay and straight relationships in the same narrative, and writing an intergenerational relationship.

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Bio:

David Pratt is the author of three novels, “Wallaçonia” (Beautiful Dreamer Press), “Looking After Joey” (Wilde City) and the Lambda Literary Award-winning “Bob the Book” (Chelsea Station). David’s story collection, “My Movie,” (Chelsea Station) includes both new work and short fiction published in Christopher Street, The James White Review, Velvet Mafia, Lodestar Quarterly and other periodicals. Recent anthology publications include Louis Flint Ceci’s “Not Just Another Pretty Face,” Paul Alan Fahey’s “The Other Man,” and Jameson Currier’s “With.”

David has directed and performed his work for the theater in New York City at the Cornelia Street Cafe, Dixon Place, HERE Arts Center, the Flea and the New York International Fringe Festival. His collaborations with Rogerio M. Pinto include “Os Tres Porquinhos,” “Chapeuzinho Vermelho,” and “Branca de Neve,” Brazilian Portuguese versions of, respectively, “The Three Little Pigs,” “Little Red Riding Hood,” and “Snow White.” In the 1980s, David was the first director of plays by the Canadian playwright John Mighton.

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05Apr/17

An Asian Minor: The True Story of Ganymede (Audiobook) by Felice Picano

REVIEW

This book was originally written in 1981 by Felice Picano, and details the early life and career of Ganymede, as told by the alluring boy in his own words. It is extremely well-written, a colourful, ribald account of his escapades as he fights off the attentions of men of all rank and age. His beauty also captures the attention of various Immortals, who will go to great lengths to seduce him. It probably should be noted to those unfamiliar with Ancient history that Ganymede is 12 at the beginning of the book, so 21st century sensibilities do not apply.

The book hasn’t been in print for a long while, but now it has been republished as an audiobook, narrated in a salacious drawl by Jason Frazier. This is the first audiobook I have listened to all the way through. The delivery is everything, especially with a book that could be dismissed as being either too highbrow by some or too lightweight by others. This would be a shame. In fact, it is a witty, sexy, sometimes humorous account of Ganymede’s life. The reader gets a peephole view into the lusty world of Troy and its inhabitants, where beauty is highly prized and judged at every turn. Ganymede is the most beautiful of all boys, gaining sexual experience with a variety of Immortal lovers, before being disgraced and shunned for rejecting the top man, Zeus; probably not his greatest career move.

Jason Frazier’s voice should have an R rating. He could read a telephone directory and make it ooze with sexual promise. The book itself is not explicit, but the theme of lust runs through it in a pulsing thread. Ganymede learns humility, but still retains an arrogance that only truly beautiful people can get away with. He isn’t particularly likeable, but that doesn’t matter. His story is told in such rich and gorgeous detail, one cannot help but be captivated. This is a book to be savoured at home, rather than driving, or in a public place, as it would be a crime to miss a single word.

I was given a copy of this Audiobook in return for an honest review.

Audible Audio Edition (2017)

Listening Length: 1 hour and 46 minutes

Version: Unabridged

Publisher: Lethe Press

Language: English

ASIN: B06XCGDZN4

 

Long out-of-print, this novella is Ganymede’s life story – unapologetic in its ribald details of Greek gods in disguise, trying to seduce the most beautiful youth in the Ancient world. When a prince of Troy is born with perfect proportions, not only does every man he meets desire him, but the Immortals want him as their lover. Ganymede loses his virginity to Hermes at 12, at 14 he captures the attention of Ares and Apollo…can Zeus be next? This risqué tale, narrated by acclaimed storyteller Jason Frazier, will appeal to all who have wondered how one boy stepped out of myth to become a gay icon.